Quick Answer: What Would Happen If There Was A Rip In The Space Time Continuum?

What does the space time continuum look like?

The space-time continuum consists of four dimensions: the three dimensions of space (length, width, and height…or up/down, left/right, and forward/backward, depending upon how you wish to think of them) plus the fourth dimension of time..

Would a black hole kill you?

The point at which tidal forces destroy an object or kill a person will depend on the black hole’s size. … For small black holes whose Schwarzschild radius is much closer to the singularity, the tidal forces would kill even before the astronaut reaches the event horizon.

How big of a black hole would destroy the earth?

D Astrophysics, University of Leicester, said a 1mm black hole would still have a mass of 10 percent that of Earth. If it was to hover on Earth’s surface, its gravitational pull would cover a third of the planet, tearing it up at 12 kilometres per second.

Can space be broken?

Spacetime can’t be broken. It can be bent or you can make loopholes through at a certain amount of speed. As general relativity says, faster you go, slower the time passes.

Do wormholes exist?

Wormholes are sci-fi staples; over the years, many stories, books and movies have sent their protagonists zipping between widely separated locales via these cosmic shortcuts. … Wormholes are possible, according to Einstein’s general theory of relativity, but nobody has ever spotted one.

What is a rip in the space time continuum?

The space-time continuum, also known as the space-time fabric, was a way to transfer between dimensions, provided the continuum was “ripped” which created a hole between each place. Waru was transported to the galaxy’s universe through such a rip in the fabric of space-time, and back to his own again in 14 ABY.

Is time a 4th Dimension?

But in the 106 years since Einstein, the prevailing view in physics has been that time serves as the fourth dimension of space, an arena represented mathematically as 4D Minkowski spacetime. …

Has anyone been in a Blackhole?

Fortunately, this has never happened to anyone — black holes are too far away to pull in any matter from our solar system. But scientists have observed black holes ripping stars apart, a process that releases a tremendous amount of energy.

How many dimensions do we live in?

In everyday life, we inhabit a space of three dimensions – a vast ‘cupboard’ with height, width and depth, well known for centuries. Less obviously, we can consider time as an additional, fourth dimension, as Einstein famously revealed.

Are humans 4 dimensional?

We are actually four dimensional. We are comprised of 4 distinct but integrated parts. Three of which are related to our physical experience – the body, heart and mind. The fourth is the dimension of consciousness or spirit.

Is it possible to rip a hole in the space time continuum?

It is absolutely possible, humanly or otherwise, but it is simply impractical. When something falls into a black hole it is said it never reaches the event horizon. … Is a black hole, an actual “tear” in the space/time continuum or is it a very, very small black sphere that would actually be tangible?

Do we live in 3d or 4d?

We live in a 3 dimensional space and a one dimensional time so a 4 dimensional spacetime.

Is time and space the same?

What Is Time? Back in the 1800s, there was space and there was time. … But there was no notion that space and time were in any sense “the same thing”. But then along came Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity—and people started talking about “spacetime”, in which space and time are somehow facets of the same thing.

Can the fabric of space be ripped?

Einstein’s general relativity says no, the fabric of space cannot tear. … In fact, the realization that quantum physics leads to violent short-distance undulations led some to speculate that rips and tears might be a commonplace microscopic feature of the spatial fabric.

What is inside a Blackhole?

A black hole is a tremendous amount of matter crammed into a very small — in fact, zero — amount of space. The result is a powerful gravitational pull, from which not even light can escape — and, therefore, we have no information or insight as to what life is like inside.